Rugby – Munster’s Sheridan talks about tackling your feelings

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Munster scrum half Cathal Sheridan who has told his story of the impact injury has on his mental wellbeing. Pic – Sportsfile

The Irish Rugby Union Players’ Association (IRUPA) in partnership with Zurich launched Tackle Your Feelings, a new mental wellbeing campaign that will see national and international rugby stars come forward to tell their own personal story of the issues they have faced off the pitch.

Munster Scrum-Half, Cathal Sheridan is one of the first players to come forward and tell his own personal story. Cathal talks about the impact of injury on his mental wellbeing and the wider lessons learned around understanding the link between feelings and behaviours.

The launch of Cathal’s video today follows Ireland and Leinster front-row Jack McGrath’s, who spoke emotively about how he coped with the death of his brother by suicide in 2010 and Irish women’s player, Hannah Tyrrell, who talked about how she overcame her struggles with self-harm and bulimia.


<p><a href=”https://vimeo.com/160207996″>Cathal Sheridan Feature Video</a> from <a href=”https://vimeo.com/user49477253″>Irish Rugby Players</a> on <a href=”https://vimeo.com”>Vimeo</a&gt;.</p>

Cathal Sheridan, Munster Rugby Player, speaks about the psychological impact that breaking his arm had on him in 2014, “”I broke my arm and following that there was a period of my life where I didn’t enjoy being a professional rugby player. I had been injured plenty of times before this instance, many much more serious and more long term, but I had always managed to deal very effectively with the challenges that go hand in hand with injuries. At the time I didn’t even understand the effect it was having on me. Not only was I not enjoying being a rugby player, I wasn’t really enjoying anything I was doing. It was only after a close friend questioned my behaviours that I realised I had been isolating myself, falling into bad habits and even blaming rugby for my frustration. Now I am a lot quicker to notice when something is wrong and I take action straight away.  I’m delighted to support the Tackle Your Feelings campaign – I’d encourage everyone to keep the lines of communication open and try not to isolate yourself during difficult periods. When something bad happens, it’s normal to feel upset. If you’re sad, feel sad, then go and do something about it”.

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